Why women need to drink water, especially when pregnant

By: Sarah Roe .

Woman drinking water
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What are the main health benefits of drinking water?

It improves digestion, regulates body temperature, improves circulation, aids in weight loss, increases energy and prevents muscle cramping.

How much should I be drinking?

In general, women should drink six to eight glasses of water in a day. You should drink a little more when pregnant. Another good rule of thumb that’s a new fitness craze is half your body weight in water (in ounces), if you’re active and burning calories and eating a lot.

How do I know if I’m getting enough water?

A good way to determine is how clear your urine is. It should be a pale yellow or clear color. Signs of dehydration include headache, constipation, dizziness, fatigue, dark/strong smelling urine.

How does getting enough water affect my health?

It is very important to your health. It keeps you hydrated. When you don’t get enough, you can become dehydrated, get headaches and dizziness. It depresses your immune system. People who drink coffee, pop, anything with caffeine in it, should add an extra glass of water for every one.

How can getting too little negatively affect my health?

Besides the above, during pregnancy, it can lead to preterm labor because you don’t have enough water in your system. Your uterus can become irritable and you can start to have contractions. In nonpregnant women, especially with the summer months coming, you can suffer heat stroke or heat exhaustion. And then if you are a runner or you’re very active, you’ll get muscle cramps more easily. People can also pass out easily.

Can drinking too much be a bad thing?

Yes. Water toxicity can occur when you drink a large amount in a short period of time, so try to spread your water intake out throughout the day. It decreases the amount of sodium in your body and causes your cells to overfill and swell.

Can I damage my body by not going to the bathroom?

You can get urinary tract infections. A lot of nurses and waitresses who are busy and don’t stop to go to the bathroom will often get urinary tract infections.

Posted In Health, Women's